Monthly Archives: January 2011

The Perpetual Improvement of Lean Design

I was asked recently to speak at the Lean Construction Institute’s Project Production Systems Laboratory Design Forum in Berkeley CA next week.

LCI P2SL in leanspeak.

While much has been written about waste – resources, material, time, money – in construction, relatively little has been written about reducing waste in the design process.

Lean design, for short.

Waste is defined here as all the things owners should not – and increasingly, will not – pay for.

Waste is also all the things the earth should not – and increasingly, will not – pay for.

Sure, there’s the lean methodology based on The Toyota Production System (TPS) from which all lean methods evolve.

Unless you believe in intelligent lean design.

But we’ll save that for another post.

If the architect’s design process is inefficient, it is so for many reasons that are outside the architect’s control, including the regulatory process and climate, availability of financing and (in)decisiveness of the owner.

That said, knowing these could be potential obstructions to an otherwise lean design approach, there is much the design team can do in advance to prepare for – and address – these inefficiencies.

So much so that I will make the subject of preparedness the topic of its own future post.

Lean Applied to the Architectural Design Process

The architectural design process is a different creature for a number of reasons.

What makes design less efficient, effective and gets its BMI way up, has as much to do with human nature as it does with streamlining the design process in more methodological ways.

The focus remains the same – on creating client value and working closely with all teammates.

What is different here are all the potential conflicts and complexity brought about by teams attempting to work together in an integrated way.

Call it the human component, the people factor. Whatever you name it, it is a very contemporary issue and one that requires our attention.

Here are a couple questions that one might ask to start a discussion.      

If you have questions that you don’t see here that you would like to see asked – I encourage you to add them in the comments below.

  • ·         What role does ego of design participants play in slowing down the design process? Making it less efficient and effective? Is there a place for ego – and related behavior – such as grandstanding, fluffing of feathers and creating bottlenecks in the flow of progress? It’s complicated. Early in one’s career, it is easy to dismiss such behavior as so much unnecessary theater – that it just calls attention to the person and away from the project. Here’s my take: If it doesn’t take away from creating value for the owner and doesn’t otherwise do any harm? A little ego – with its attendant storytelling and jive talk – is OK, goes a long way, serves as a lubricant to the often lengthy and involved design process and keeps life and meetings interesting.
  • ·         If this were your last project with your client – guaranteed to never work with them again – would you be less concerned about marketing your services, additional or otherwise? Would you be less afraid to ask questions that potentially make you our to be less of an expert you’re expected – or you purported – to be?
  • ·         Is the end project a known entity? Or does it require reinventing the wheel? Some designers need to innovate with each project irrespective of the assignment. But not all projects call for unique solutions. Buildings types should be adjusted for their particular region and location – but do not require the seemingly endless spinning of wheels often associated with projects being re-imagined whole cloth.
  • ·         Important team members arrive at meetings late – sometimes requiring those who did show up on time to review progress made in the meeting up until that point. Other times, their arrival is disruptive, interrupting the progress that had been made. In the Morphosis case study in advanced practice ($14.95 at di.net or view for free here) Morphosis principal Thom Mayne was late and project manager Tim Christ ran the meeting that covered mechanical, electrical, and structural issues of a 68 story tower design. When Mayne did finally arrive, his behavior was telling: He listened briefly to the conversation; he was concerned about various issues related to the cooling and ventilation systems; and he reminded the assembled team about the design intentions for the building. In other words, he made the project (and client value) the focus of attention – not himself. Something rare for an architect of that stature.
  • ·         Not utilizing people’s skills – their interests, their talents, not keeping them motivated and engaged – is also wasteful. And the negative energy they let out can be devastating to the workflow and corrosive to an otherwise tight knit team.
  • ·         Because they often flip projects once completed, developers are often more concerned about first costs over the life cycle of the building: lowest price over value. This practice is wasteful in the long haul, and takes a great deal of the architect and other design team member’s time and resources to convince them to act otherwise.

This presentation on Set Based Design in the building industry from a 2009 LCI Design forum is truly exceptional. Simply put, in Set Based Design a broad range of alternatives are considered, then choices are narrowed until a superior solution is found. It is somewhat similar to Integrated Project Delivery in that the earliest phases are front loaded with information and design options. From a lean perspective, the question becomes:

  • ·         How many alternatives are too many – at which point their production becomes wasteful?
  • ·         Can the design team distinguish between true alternatives – and choices – vs. variations on a theme? The presentation of slight variations alongside alternative designs can be wasteful – especially if the design is not among the contenders.

Several years ago, in a project interview for a $100M assignment with the building owner, the owner asked the four of us on the design team a number of questions about our process.

At one point he asked: How many designs will I get? (Ostensibly, in exchange for his $100M.)

As the senior designer of the project, I responded by saying what any red-blooded, self-respecting and (at the time) fiscally irresponsible designer would say:

“As many as you want!”

The project manager reeled it in a bit by saying: one!

“You will get one design.”

The firm’s high-profile partner said:

“Three. We typically find that three is satisfactory.”

The marketing director taught me an incredible lesson: he said – in fact, he asked

“How many do you want?”

That one worked. We got the job.

And after the interview – after we as a team started communicating and listening better and making sure we were on the same page – we helped to assure that the design process was a lean one: in oversight and spirit, if not in methodology.

You learn that most mistakes in judgment in the early design phases are forgivable – as long as you learn from them.

A little every day. It adds up.

What improvements to the design process would you suggest?

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Filed under design professionals, Integrated Design, Integrated Project Delivery, IPD, people, process, workflow

CAD Monkeys, Dinosaur Babies and T-Shaped People

What’s with the weird title, you’re wondering?

“T Shaped People” I have written about here in the past.

“CAD Monkeys?” Most readers of this blog are aware of the term and probably wish they weren’t, having at one time or another in their career either served as one or know someone who did.

But “Dinosaur Babies?”

I’ll get to that in a moment.

But first I want to address a subject most people think about this time of year: namely, change.

We all want to make changes in our lives. Most of us for the better.

Not everybody, though, is willing to do what is necessary to make these changes for real.

So they take shortcuts. They embellish, they pad.

Back to the Title

The other day I ordered what appeared to be a new book by Warren Berger

The title of this post is also the title of the book.

CAD Monkeys Dinosaur Babies and T Shaped People

A book I almost bought – yes, I admit, in part because of its suggestive and quirky title – among other reasons.

In fact, I did buy it – until I realized that I had already read it.

Don’t get me wrong. It’s is a great book with great thoughts and ideas about design thinking. One that would warrant several readings.

Some who design for a living complain that the book didn’t teach them anything they didn’t already know.

I design for a living – and have done so for 25 years – and still got a great deal out of the book.

One wrote that the book is “for the beginners only – designers don’t waste your time.”

But isn’t that the point? When we design it is best to put yourself in the position of beginner’s mind – to see yourself as a beginner, not an expert.

We’re all – in other words – beginners.

See for yourself.

Or check out these “Glimmerisms” excerpted from the book.

The Glimmer quotes are truly amazing – I promise. Here’s one more chance in case you missed it.

But I had no need for 2 copies of the same book.

So I cancelled my order.

I “un-bought” it. Something you can only do online.

I read a lot of books. A lot. Almost one a day.

So how could I not remember having read a book called CAD Monkeys Dinosaur Babies and T Shaped People?

Because that is not what it was called when I read it…just 6 months earlier.

At that time, the book had a different title.

Glimmer

Glimmer, the hardcover, has just been issued in paperback as CAD Monkeys Dinosaur Babies and T Shaped People

Glimmer’s subtitle is: How Design Can Transform Your Life, and Maybe Even the World

That had also changed.

You would think with a title as ungainly as CAD Monkeys Dinosaur Babies and T Shaped People would at least have a shorter subtitle.

Nope. The new subtitle is this:

Inside the World of Design Thinking and How It Can Spark Creativity and Innovation

I know. There are books that change when issued in paperback.

They have new chapters, a new foreword or epilogue.

Or have been revised based on new information.

This is not one of them.

In fact, if you look in Glimmer’s index, there is only one (1!) mention of CAD monkeys in the book.

Ascribed to Architecture for Humanity’s Cameron Sinclair. Describing the role he found himself in before being inspired to make a change for himself.

One subsequently having a profound impact on our world.

Sometimes books do change their titles – for marketing reasons. That’s fine.

As long as they mention it – so would-be customers don’t make the mistake I almost made. (And have done so before…)

And mention it in something larger than 4 pt. font at the bottom of the postage size stamp image if the book.

There’s a message here.

Make it your cause to become more of who you already are.

If you are dedicated to truly changing then do so. Be transparent about it.

Don’t go around changing your status and headline, your resume and bio, when nothing has really changed.

In other words, don’t go around changing your online identity.

Change – for real.

Don’t opportunistically change because you think that’s what the market wants.

Where are the BIM monkeys?

This incident got me thinking

If there was such a thing as a BIM monkey, what would that be?

Why aren’t there BIM monkeys?

It’s simple, really.

There are Reviteers – a cross between Revit, Musketeers and Imagineers. But it’s too vendor specific.

Someone working in BIM is empowered from the start – gets a first look at what they’re creating – often before anyone else.

Are they often tired, overworked, overly-challenged by the technology? Sure.

But they’re at the front lines.

Strategizing, creating, not just picking up someone else’s redlines.

BIM monkeys? Never.

Call them BIM guerillas.

As for “Dinosaur Babies?” That’s a term coined by IDEO designer Paul Bennett.

They’re the early design efforts (read: quirky and idiosyncratic) that, well, only its designer can love.

“Destined to be loved by only its creator,” Berger puts it.

Kind of like the title of his book.

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Filed under BIM, people, Uncategorized