Tag Archives: interoperability

NYC Revit Users Group to Acquire Chicago BIM-IPD Group

CHICAGO – Sept 24, 2010. New York to Become One of the World’s Leading Revit Groups Through Planned Merger With Chicago

With more and more BIM groups forming, interoperability advocates wonder how the industry can best consolidate its efforts.

Today, they may have found their answer.

In what could only be described as a sign of the times, the NYC Revit Users Group (NASDAQ: NRUG) purchased David Ivey’s Chicago BIM-IPD Group, its 2nd acquisition in 2 weeks.

Megalith NYC Revit Users Group (USA) (NYSE) 28.75 -0.06‎ (-0.45%‎)  Sep 22 4:00pm ET 27.65‎ -0.09‎ (-0.20%‎) After Hours in heavy trading, said Thursday it will buy the Chicago group outright.

It was unclear whether Andre Baros’ Chicago BIM Community, whose members were in attendance for Thursday’s monthly proceedings, was part of the deal.

Terms of the deal were not released

In after hours M&A movement, NYC Revit Group (TSX: NYR, NYSE: NROD) is taking a giant leap forward with its plan to become one of the world’s leading BIM groups through a signed letter of intent for the Chicago-headquartered BIM-IPD Group.

Whether the NYC Revit Users Group intends to acquire all of the buildingSMART alliance Interest Groups by the end of 2010, to create neutral ground and to bring unity to the growing trend, remains to be seen.

“That’s the $64,000 question,” says Bill Simmons, KIRK executive vice president.  “I believe it’s in the industry’s best interest to provide a unified vision that we can work toward which is meaningful and deliverable.”

There has been no announcement whether the combined groups will continue to meet in their respective cities or in a mutually convenient location such as Cleveland, which currently doesn’t support a Revit Users Group, or for that matter, a restaurant.

NYC Revit Users Group (NYC-RUG) has its designs on other groups

The new megalith will promote open standards that link national and international stakeholders in development, construction, design and building management sectors and serve refreshments.

Revit Users Group Sydney did not comment for this post.

There is no word at this point as to New York’s intention to maintain the IPD identity.

“That’s the $64,000 question,” said Simmons.

James Vandezande, HOK Senior Associate in NYC, was in town Thursday to give a masterful talk to the two Chicago groups in attendance at HOK’s Chicago offices on the subject of buildingSMART in Architecture, and to give away a copy of his new book, Mastering  Autodesk Revit Architecture 2011, to a lucky winner.

Turnout for another outstanding meeting of the Chicago BIM-IPD Group was standing room only, overflowing out into the adjoining lobby and beyond.

Vandezande, President of NYC-RUG, prolific co-author of the magisterial Mastering Autodesk Revit Architecture 2011 and blogger at All Things BIM, where they have recently featured the London RUG which NYC-RUG is also currently looking to acquire.

David Ivey, an Associate with HOK, who will maintain his current role and title through the merger, was unavailable to comment.

Chicago is the BIM Group No. 3 in the crosshairs after last week’s announcement that NYC Revit Users Group had acquired the Seattle BIM Group.

Vandezande said the acquisition will give the group a much stronger presence in the Midwestern U.S., while the Seattle BIM Group buyout will help it grow in Northwestern states.

With would-be architect Barack Obama in the White House, could the Washington DC Revit Users Group be next?

The final purchase price for the Seattle BIM group hasn’t been disclosed. However, a recent filing with the Northwest Securities Administrators shows that NYC Revit Users Group used $70 of its cash flow to acquire refreshments in 2009.

It recently agreed to buy Seattle BIM Group, an architecture and engineering Revit users group with more than 30 gatherings in 13 conference rooms.

Financial terms of the deal were not announced.

Architectural Record, a trade publication, ranked Chicago BIM-IPD Group as the 2nd-largest BIM-IPD Group, with $126 in total snack fund reserves for 2011.

NYC Revit Users Group is quite the acquisitive firm, with some indication that it plans to acquire nine Revit and BIM groups in 2010.

Chicago BIM-IPD Group traces its roots to 2007, when Ivey founded the group while meeting before work hours at a local restaurant. It came to HOK in 2009.

The two purchases help move NYC Revit Users Group toward its goal of world domination, becoming the leading global Revit Users Group, the group said. This acquisition brings the total anticipated purchases of BIM or Revit groups announced this year to eleven.

So who will find its way next into NYC-RUG’s acquisition crosshairs?

“That’s the $64,000 question,” said Simmons.

Copyright © 2010 The Associative Press. All rights reserved.

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Filed under BIM organizations, impact, Integrated Project Delivery, IPD

My So-Called Parametric Life

This life has been a test. If this had been an actual life, you would have received instructions on where to go and what to do.                                                                                                         Angela in “My So-Called Life” 1994

Is it just me or has life gone totally parametric? Perhaps only a BIM evangelist, BIMhead or BIMaholic would propose BIM as a metaphor for life. (Guilty as charged.) So, what does it mean to live a parametric life?

It is not, of course, that you are a Revit model or are about to become one. While that is for some a distant possibility, your story – the one you are putting out there, not your life but your so-called life – has become a Revit model. Have you noticed?

Ask yourself this: At any time in your previous life (BB = Before BIM, AC = After CAD) did you ever dream in CAD? Those who used to work in CAD would recognize the scenario where you go home at the end of a long day at the monitor and dream in CAD – dreaming that you are living in a 2D drawing – in a CAD world.

Living a Parametric Life

I am not asking what it means to dream in BIM or what it means to have BIM dreams. To work so hard and for so long in BIM that we start dreaming in…3 dimensions? We already do that and have for millennia. Little more than wearing 3D glasses to bed.

But living in BIM? That’s something else altogether. Living in BIM is something that we’re only now getting around to doing. We find ourselves living in BIM

  • because in some ways we’re well ahead of the technology, processing information and anticipating next moves that leaves the software – however well-intentioned – in the dust.
  • because we recognize some of the amazing things the process accomplishes and we want to model the behavior in our own lives.
  • because we know in our bones that BIM is the future – we get it – and we want to be part and parcel of this future.

We’re told over and over that the software thinks just like us – architects, contractors, whoever. But most of us have discovered, some the hard way, that we have come, over time, to think like the software. Revit doesn’t think like us – we’re thinking like Revit. That’s living in BIM.

I offer these 14 Rules for Living In, Out and Around BIM not as failsafe rules we need to follow – but to bring to our attention things we’re already doing right, right now, and ought to build on as we move forward. In other words, behavior – not buildings – that we ought to be modeling.

14 Rules for Living In, Out and Around BIM

  • Be the interoperability you want to see. The old words don’t apply – learn the new vocabulary and make sure that everyone you speak with understands how you are using these terms. You want to be speaking the same language, make sure you are working on the same page. Until the time comes when models talk with each other, and software speaks fluidly with complete comprehension, take it upon yourself to make sure you are speaking the same language with those you work with, no matter their role on the team. How can we expect our software to be interoperable if we aren’t?
  • A change anywhere is a change everywhere. You get the concept: Work you do in one part impacts the others. Parametrics, of course, is a distinguishing quality of building information modeling (BIM.) As with bidirectional associativity, a change anywhere is a change everywhere. There’s no escaping it – a change made in one place – compartment, area, phase – of your life impacts all the other places of your life. So be careful about what you change – whether your work habits, the way you communicate or how you operate within the team. Whatever you change about yourself will have repercussions throughout. Being parametric implies you’re consistent, you stay on-story, and you’re building not just a model but a brand. No matter how they cut you, you’re the same through and through.
  • Your space-keeper and workaround is someone else’s obstruction. The choices and decisions we make must have integrity because they will be repeated everywhere. What’s worse, you will be judged by the integrity of your information. If you are awaiting information and need to plug something in just to keep the ball moving – notify the team – especially contractors who view missing data as roadblocks, no matter your good intentions or justification. And don’t make a habit of it. Your goal ought to be to see how long you can keep the plates spinning.
  • You can’t step into the same model twice. A model is more like a river than a thing. Your contribution to the building of the model has more to do with the communication of information than the rock-solid enclosure you consider your domain. We’re not designing objects or things (and never really were) – but flows, communicating information to others. The model you jump into and help out on today is not the same model you worked on yesterday – especially if you’re working on an integrated team. The more you can think in terms of systems and flows the better off you’ll be.
  • Run an internal clash detection of your team before starting on the project. Look for supportive personalities, learners, those who are passionate and excited to work, those who enjoy what they do and for whom working in BIM – and ideally on this particular project – was a choice. And weed out the devil’s advocates and other contrarians – unless the criticism is constructive, regularly leading to decisions and action, offering alternatives when one course is shot down.
  • Consistency is king. Aim for an inherent consistency to everything you do. Take LOD. Make sure your team knows what level of detail (LOD) you are modeling to. That each part of the model has the same level of detail. Think of detail in terms of levels – as in levels of detail – that are built upon. A conceptual model ought to have conceptual level of detail throughout the model. Same with a model used for energy analysis, for quantity take-offs and estimating, for fabrication. And so on. Like roughing out a sketch – you start with the basic shapes, then you fill in detail, until the image is fleshed out. So too with the consistency of the information you impart. If you are job hunting – don’t, under your “Reading on Amazon” widget – have the 4-Hour Work Week as your recommended book. It undermines your message. Use LinkedIn’s book section to reinforce your message or let others know what you’re reading – but stay on-message. That goes for your work both in the model and on your team. Don’t say one thing and do another. That’s so CAD.
  • What you see is what you get. Your model is only as good as the information that you put in it. Garbage in, garbage out. There’s no hiding anymore. So be real. There’s no faking it either– who we are and what we do are expected to be real, so be real. Hemingway had what he called a built-in bullshit detector. All the best writers have this. You need to develop or acquire this talent for yourself. And be aware that those working but upstream and downstream from you have their turned up on high.
  • Decisions are consequences. We’re no longer designing objects or things, but courses of action. Our decisions impact others – we need to be aware of the consequences for our courses of action on every facet of  the team and process. Look at every decision you make in terms of whom it impacts both upstream and downstream.
  • While you model the building, model your behavior. Think of each team and project you are on as an opportunity to put in an exemplary performance. You are serving as a role model for others whether you are aware of it or not. And as with raising kids, your behavior – the way you act and perform – is worth 10X the impact of your words.
  • Perform an expectation audit. How you see the model/what you do might be different from how others see it – ask them how they plan on using the model – then try as best you can to accommodate them. Ask the contractor early on how they plan on using the model, what level of detail they would like to see in the model, then try to accommodate them. If money is an issue, discuss being compensated or remunerated with the owner.
  • Play well with others even if your software doesn’t. Another way of saying get in the habit of behaving as though the software does what you want it to do – because the time will come, soon – when it will. You want to be ready for when the day arrives. Better the technology plays catch-up, not you.
  • Your model doesn’t limit itself to 3D. Why should you? Don’t limit yourself to 3 dimensions. What about a 4D you and a 5D you? If you are doing your job and even doing it well you might be selling yourself sort – by a dimension or two. Look for ways you can be contributing beyond your title and role. Because when you work on an integrated team, you are more – much more – than these labels. Yes, you need to perform and do the work that has been assigned to you, your teammates are relying on you for this. Your model isn’t limited to 3D – nor are you. What would the 4D version of yourself look like? But the true value of working collaboratively is the way you keep others – and their focus – in your peripheral vision – just of your own cone of focus. Look for ways to cut time – and save money – for others, and be prepared to make these suggestions before the subjects come up. Always keep an eye on the horizon – and the topic of the next team meeting.
  • Ask yourself: If I was the model what else would I do? What else can I provide that others may need? Your original intention for your model may have been to use the model for one thing – but what if you also used it for a rendering? For an animation? As a database to run energy applications? Similarly – ask yourself: what else can you do or provide that others may need? How else can you push the envelope on yourself in terms of what you can add in the way of value at this time, for these team members, on this project?
  • Are you leveraging the technology of your team? Look around you – at those seated at the table. Do they have certain skillsets, experience or resources that you could leverage to help you to meet and even surpass your goals? You leverage the deep capability of the software and virtual model – why not leverage these same attributes and qualities in those you count on every day to come through for you?

Your turn: Can you think of Rules for Living In, Out and Around BIM that are missing here, that you might add or rules you see that clash with this model?

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Filed under BIM, BIM expert, collaboration, modeling, process, workflow